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How many times have you said, or heard … “If I only had a dollar for every …”

Well Red Tag Trout Tours and Hurley’s Fly Fishing are doing just that!

It’s 150 years of trout = $150 of benefit to you!

A dollar for every year of the wild trout’s existence in Tasmania, since 1864, equals a $150 gift voucher for each extended booking till June 30 2015.

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Just launched: the 150th anniversary of trout in Tasmania photographic competition.

There are many categories:

  • 150th year action
  • historic section
  • juniors
  • interstate
  • international
  • and cellphone selfie

There’s a great range of prizes to be won.

Competition closes 31st March 2015 with a gala presentation dinner at the Central Highlands Community Hall on 18th April 2015.

Full details and entry via the web site.

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Darren, from Puddleduck Vineyard in the Coal Valley, releasing a nice wild brown (1.4kg) at Currawong Lakes recently.

Ended with three good fish to hand, a top quality fish break-off and dropped a couple of others, not bad for first trip in ages.

His wife thought he was due a well-earned break to flick a fly again. We did a day at Currawong Lakes and the second on the Macquarie River.

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Despite some ‘breeze’ and morning rain on Day 2, Darren was the first ‘Tagger to get one on the dry in this 150th anniversary season.

Followed it up with another and had a couple more misses. On the mayfly emerger again.

Overnight we had it tough with a very tasty drop of Puddleduck’s new Riesling to wash down our Cinzano Chicken and Apple Crumble. As they say someone has to do the hard yakka.

The four minute version:

The 40 minute version:

After the new season opening couple of weekends ago was tempered by snow, freezing temps and wind, the last week or so has been magical Tassie late winter weather. More like late spring.

Couldn’t resist any longer – had to take a look and put a toe in the water so to speak.

A sight to gladden the fly fisher’s heart … spotted rising rainbows (right on the shore line) on our teaching water and it’s still winter!

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Just to show not a one-off, this one was snapped feeding regularly out in the middle.

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Now Available through Red Tag.

Hot off the workbench, prize-winning Lark Distillery have produced these special 150th anniversary whiskey flasks to commemorate the first ever trout introduced to the southern hemisphere — the Wild brown trout in 1864.

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Trout Guides & Lodges Tasmania (TGALT) and its members are delighted to promote these commemorative hip flasks.

Red Tag is happy to purchase them for you and arrange Postage & Handling to your preferred address.

Price is $48 rrp + P&H for single purchase and $45 each (+P&H) for two or more.

The come in a black, lined presentation box (price excludes whiskey).

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Both Bentleigh and Geelong get-togethers were popular.

Gavin’s edited videos on Tasmania from their Tassie DVD and ‘On The Fly’ TV series were great. Central Highland and Western Lakes plus rivers & streams gave everyone an excellent overview of Tasmania’s trout fishery.

We finished off with the 150th Anniversary wild brown trout intro doco teaser and reminded all of the $50,000+ 2014-15 season Tassie trout licence draw.

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Second cast on Day 1 and Jean-Paul (trout/fly guide in Switzerland) has his first to hand!

Wanting to “dry fly only if possible, Roger”, Jean-Paul did just that for two consecutive days in the last week of the season!

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Using an 8′ #2wt Explorer (from Hurley’s Fly Fishing new range), he brings another nice stream wild brown to hand.

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Second day on the rainforest stream … tight conditions meant tight roll casts, but rewards were plenty.

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Another good wild brown from a tight position.

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Final trout on Day 2 – brought the total to hand to 22 – all on the dry and about 35 to the fly.

It was a pleasure to put Jean-Paul onto some lovely wild brown trout in beautiful spots around Tasmania, and admire his presentation and skills in action.

You can read his own account of this Tasmanian experience on his web site and go to the ‘blog’ link for the full story.